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Gappeq

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‘ you can still hear all the instruments but the important thing happens when you forget they exist and let yourself be carried away by the atmosphere of the piece. It is very difficult because it is so very easy. You probably don’t wanna hear anything like; straight kickin’ beat, rollin’ 16th bass, razor-sharp synths, weird twisted soundscapes, unexpectable arranges. And you probably have heard two thousand times something like ‘transcendental ecstasy of the enlightened soul having it his life-mission to embed his experience into his music that is meant to embrace all beings …

However it is really not much more than that – appart from million psytrance fans all over the world keeping all psytrance artists (whatever they do: music, pictures, videos, radios, labels…) going, giving it all meaning and significancy and apart from our beloved ones that might not care about psytrance at all but keep us going as well and apart from those beutifull moments at our gatherings when all of it somehow suddenly falls into place and you’re looking around and feeling the ‘yeah, this is it!!!’ …

Introduce yourself please a bit, who are you, where you come from and how you found the link to electronic dancemusic?
hi, my name is Jiri Tomasek and i’ve been doing music since i was a 12 years old kid. my dad plays everything he puts his hands on so it came sort of from him. i started playing the country guitar and when he did’t have anything more to teach me, i found myself a classical guitar teacher and spent the next 4 years playing Vivaldi and Sor etc.
it was in this period when i heard trance music for the first time and it was Paul Van Dyk who caught my attention with his Seven Ways. from that time on i started exploring and making trance and drum’n’bass and dub and industrial and breakbeat and playing at some underground parties together with my good friends. with one of them – Spacer (another czech psytrance producer) we were also putting on series of concerts of underground czech electronic music bands and projects.
then in 2001 i went to a party with Transdriver as the main live-act and was blown away with this crazy madness called psytrance.
i have also played the keyboards at a reggae-fusion band for about 6 years.

Define psytrance for us please.
it is very difficult because it is so very easy. you probably don’t wanna hear anything like ‘straight kickin’ beat, rollin’ 16th bass, razor-sharp synths, weird twisted soundscapes, unexpectable arranges…’ and you probably have heard two thousand times something like ‘transcendental ecstasy of the enlightened soul having it his life-mission to embed his experience into his music that is meant to emrace all beings…’.
however it is really not much more than that – appart from millions psytrance fans all over the world keepeing all psytrance artists (whatever they do: music, pictures, videos, radios, labels…) going, giving it all meaning and significancy and apart from our beloved ones that might not care about psytrance at all but keep us going as well and apart from those beutifull moments at our gatherings when all of it somehow suddenly falls into place and you’re looking around and feeling the ‘yeah, this is it!!!’

What does Gappeq means, if there is a meaning?
it’s just a word that doesn’t mean anything else and that i made up after two days of intensive thinking. no cool stories… 🙂

How do you see the difference in the usual famous full on music mostly dominated by israelian artists focus on melodic dominance, and the style you use to produce? You’ve experienced already that people were astonished or even shocked of what you are presenting?
i think the biggest difference is that my music don’t focus on melody that much. i rather unwind a half a minute of crazy effect percussion sequence than a half a minute of a melody hooting. my focus is on the drive and carefuly textured experimental atmospheres and soundscapes. my approach is more abstract, and if i use a melody it should surprise a listener.
i compare it to rock music versus jazz. the approach of a sound engineer when mixing a rock song is to make everything shine, separate it, make it stand out, and of course – vocal is the main thing. however when mixing a jazz quartet the goal is to make it all blend together. you can still hear all the instruments but the important thing happens when you forget they exist and let yourself be carried away by the atmosphere of the piece.
that is my style. i would even go to the extreme and blend it so that the listener would not recognize what is what anymore. it is very close to techno approach actually.

isratrance is about clarity and shine. i also like dirt and rawness.

How you would like that your music has to be described as? It’s a special taste you are doing, so what are your inspirations? You have any musical backrounds?
since i moved to Australia two years ago, my music has changed a lot. you wouldn’t find so many straightforward melodies in it anymore and it’s got much darker. i wouldn’t describe it, i would leave it for others to describe it – i love making it.
my inspiration is the life itself at the first place. i found it reflects in my music to such extent it is unbelivable.
music i like to listen to is mostly somehow experimental – drum’n’bass, metal, jazz, classical music, world music, techno, breakcore, dub, dubstep, stuff like Bjork, The Necks, Pink Floyd, Beck, Radiohead, Nick Cave, Portishead and much more.

In your travels you have had an experience you would like to mention as a special one? And do you see a difference in the scenes in Southamerica, Japan and Europe?
man, every gig is a special one. however i haven’t played around as much so i’m not able to answer your question properly. i have lived in Sydney for the last two years, mainly studying audio engineering, and before that i played around europe only.
there is not that big difference between european and australian scene, people are the same everywhere – two legs, two arms and a head filled with all those beautifull ideas and thoughts about community, oneness and cooperation, all wrapped up in a nice colourfull outfit, smiling and hopping around on the dancefloor. the australian scene is more spread out around the country though and there is not that many big events happening throughout a year. australian parties, even the small ones, are possesed by a very special atmosphere caused among others by being so far away from everything in the middle of the bush with a bunch of people from all over the world – it is very special.

It’s obvious, that P_Mac in Austria supports you each compilation in giving you the opportunity to open his discs. How the relationship to Ketuh comes true and can we expect your album also soon?
obviously we are very good friends and our relationship remains unharmed even though i had to leave the Ketuh family for reasons more practical and technical than personal. i would definitely like to continue releasing my music on Ketuh Records while my album and name is taken care of by Wirikuta Recordings. you can expect the album to come out sometime around september this year.

Tell us about your local scene, are there any events to mention and do you have to fight against legal restraints, like communities in France, UK or even we in South Germany?

the local scene for me has been australia recently, and there are not any real problems like yours that i know about. if you do a party and you take care of all the stuff that makes it legal (and there is really a lot to do!) then there is no problem at all (possibly except for your budget). it is a big land, so it is not that difficult to find a spot where your event is not a problem for anybody.

What are your future plans, any projects in pipe? And where do you will play next, do we have the pleasure to see you playing in Germany?
I am comming back to Czech Republic later on this year, leaving Australia in september, spending some time travelling and playing in New Zealand, then Thailand and India and i am open to any bookings that might come along the way. wanna get home by christmass.
my plan after that is to make as much good music as possible and not only psytrance – i am also starting an experimental downtempo side-project.

What do you expect from the psyscene in the next years, where it will evolve to? You have any whishes?
certainly i wish all those organisers in countries still striving hard to get some people to the psychedelic dancefloor and just get their expenses back some advance, because doing it only for the love of music not getting a proper feedback is quite hardcore. however thats one of the things that holds us together, isn’t it?
i don’t worry about the music. it will always find its way, and there will always be enough popular music for people to stick to and enough alternative experimental underground for them to explore and think about. from time to time these poles wil be overlaping, moving and even becoming one another. but that can’t stop the way of music, ever-evolving and flowing through those that can make it appear.

Any messege to send to the community?
endless thanks to anybody who has ever bought a psytrance cd, come to a party or helped with making any of them, to all of you, who keep us going, who make it all possible. what you’ve done matters. please, continue.

Thank you very much !!!
(Ilse)

Thank you for your good questions!!!
Gappeq