Iacchus

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Q. Please tell about Iacchus project. I mean story of its appearance.
A. Iacchus started in 2007 after a whimsical decision to write a downtempo track. I had previously been producing jungle and other hard dance music but decided to try write something more akin to artists like Plaid. ‘Awareum’ was this first track. I was also at the time starting to listen to bands like Shpongle and Ott and was enjoying this side of psychedelic music. I decided to try and write an album that was one performance, similar to Shpongle’s ‘Nothing Lasts but Nothing is Lost’, and as such Subjectivity was created over the next year or two. I soon realised I found this more fun than producing jungle and was getting a better reception internationally so decided to focus my efforts on the project from there on.

Q. What have changed in your life since your last visit in Moscow?
A. A huge amount has changed since my last visit to Moscow. I have moved to another city, fallen in love, and started a family. I have a beautiful daughter named Annabelle who is 5 months old, we have bought a caravan and are planning for a summer of festivals and adventures.

Q. How your musical approach changed during that time and how it reflected on your new album?
A. My musical approach hasn’t changed hugely, although I have switched to a new Digital Audio Workstation called Bitwig, which benefits from lots of new modulation possibilities and encourages you to build your own instruments and effects. Using this new DAW has changed the sound of my music to some extent as I cannot create all the same effects I used to be able to, so have been forced to do things a bit differently and create new sounds (which I think is a good thing).

Q. How long have you collaborated with Mystic Sound Records label and why do you choose it for releasing your music?
A. I have been working with Mystic Sound for about three years now. I chose them because I think they have a great vision for music style and are very active both in cyberspace and involvement in parties. I can see they put a huge amount of work into what they do and that is something I want to be a part of.

Q. How was the Fabric of Cosmos album being created?
A. I have been working on Fabric of the Cosmos when I could find the time over the last two or three years. It has been hard because I was very busy with my personal life over that time, so I struggled to find opportunities to work on it. Musically, I decided to have an album that was less based in ethnic instruments like my last album, and more based in creative sound design and synthesizer work. I also wanted to create an album that spanned a lot of styles, I wanted every track to be very different.

Q. What do you want to tell your listeners through your music?
A. I think it is up to my listeners to get what they want from their music. There is a theme to the album title and track names, some of which taken from a William Blake poem, “Auguries of Innocence”, which I feel makes some very insightful points about the nature of human experience.

Q. What is your favorite musical instrument?
A. Arguably the computer is my favourite musical instrument, as it is what I choose to create in. Apart from that, I love the human voice, which is endlessly versatile, I listen to a lot of acapella singing. If I had to pick a physical instrument, the Cello, which I think has a beautiful tone.

Q. Do you have any traditions or rituals before you’re going on stage?
A. This may not sound very professional but I like to have a few drinks before I go on stage which loosens me up and gets me in the mood, otherwise I am nervous and look like a rabbit trapped in headlights and it is not especially fun to perform and probably doesn’t look great either.

Q. What emotions would you like to give your listeners?
A. Again I would rather my listeners chose what emotive response to get from my music, as long as someone somewhere gets an experience from it, I am happy. That is what art is all about, inspiring something, a response, good or bad, happy or sad, angry or exuberance.

Q. Which music inspires you? Have you discovered any new genres/projects recently?
A. This particular album took inspiration especially from an album called ‘Deliverance’ by Culprate. And also a producer called Clap! Clap!. But the music I make is always the product of everything I have ever heard and will always be heavily influenced especially by all the talented producers of psychill making music alongside me.

Your life-story and relationship with your work

Tell us a little about you and your work:
Iacchus started in 2007 after a whimsical decision to write a downtempo track. I had previously been producing jungle and other hard dance music but decided to try write something more akin to artists like Plaid. ‘Awareum’ was this first track. I was also at the time starting to listen to bands like Shpongle and Ott and was enjoying this side of psychedelic music. I decided to try and write an album that was one performance, similar to Shpongle’s ‘Nothing Lasts but Nothing is Lost’, and as such Subjectivity was created over the next year or two. I soon realised I found this more fun than producing jungle and was getting a better reception internationally so decided to focus my efforts on the project from there on.